Dating brookfield insulators

dating brookfield insulators

How old are Brookfield insulators?

Two CD 126 style Brookfield insulators, in light green and light blue aqua, dating from the 1880s. Brookfield made more than 100 different types of insulators during its history, and some types that are illustrated in their 1912 catalog have never been found (assuming they actually existed).

What are the dots on the top of a Brookfield insulator for?

Some Brookfield insulators (of several styles, including small “ponies” and “beehives”) are found with one or two “raised dots” on the very top. No one is sure what they are for, but it is generally assumed they were intended as a mold identifying mark, probably equivalent to a number or letter.

When was the Brookfield Glass Company incorporated?

The Brookfield Glass Company was officially incorporated in 1898 and (again!) in 1908, although that exact company name may have been used, unofficially, for a considerable time beforehand. One interesting note: No insulators are known with a “Bushwick Glass Works” marking.

How rare is a Brookfield Glass Jar?

Evidently it is a very rarely seen item, and probably dates from the 1860s or 1870s. A very rare type of fruit jar embossed “Brookfield/55/Fulton St/N.Y.” is known, but only a very few examples have been found by collectors. CD 133 style glass insulator marked “BROOKFIELD” and “No 20”.

How many types of insulators does Brookfield make?

During the 1870s, Brookfield began producing large amounts of insulators at their Brooklyn plant, and the quantity of insulators produced was second only to the Hemingray Glass Company. It is estimated that over 100 types of insulators were produced by Brookfield. In 1906, a second plant was opened in Old Bridge, New Jersey.

When was the Brookfield Glass Company incorporated?

The Brookfield Glass Company was officially incorporated in 1898 and (again!) in 1908, although that exact company name may have been used, unofficially, for a considerable time beforehand. One interesting note: No insulators are known with a “Bushwick Glass Works” marking.

What is the history of Bushwick insulators?

For a period of approximately 57 years, huge quantities of insulators marked “W.BROOKFIELD”, “BROOKFIELD”, and “B”, were produced. It’s very likely some of the earliest insulator styles that were made (circa 1864-1868) were not marked with a manufacturer’s name, and so remain currently unidentified as Bushwick products.

Are antique insulator glass insulators worth anything?

Antique glass insulators do have an electrifying and interesting history, but you’d be surprised at how much they are worth. Since they’re made of glass which itself isn’t a product that requires too many expensive ingredients to make, insulator glass tends to sell, on average, for $20.

What does a Brookfield Glass bottle look like?

The name “BROOKFIELD” is embossed in large block lettering on the shoulder. They usually look shiny and brand new, with no damage or scratching at all. They show no base wear, and they have no glassmaker logo or mark to indicate who made them. From what I understand, they are also the type with a “double face” on the bottle.

Where is Brookfield Glass located?

Welcome to Brookfield Glass! For over 30 years, Brookfield Glass has been servicing customers in Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. We are a family-owned business based in Brookfield, Connecticut with deep roots in Brookfield and the surrounding area.

What is the difference between Brookfield Glass and Bushwick Glass Works?

Note: In general, the name Bushwick Glass Works applied to the physical factory, and Brookfield Glass Company was the actual firm (company or business organization) that operated the works, although these two names are often used interchangeably and may be considered almost synonymous.

How much is the rarest Mason Jar?

The latter can apparently cost up to $1,000 today. The Mason jar’s lid was invented before the jar itself. This is the rarest Mason jar on this list. It is unique for several reasons. First off, Warren Van Vliet attempted to improve the jar’s sealing properties with a clamp that hooked over the lid.

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